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THE MISCONCEPTION OF MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND THERAPY

Posted by stephan van breenen on August 19, 2013 at 4:15 AM Comments comments (2)

-SO MANY THERAPIES ARE GEARED TO CORRECT THE MUSCLE IMBALANCE, IT DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE TO ME THE ROUND SHOULDERNESS THIS GOES THEREFORE TO SAY YOU NEED TO STRETCH THE TIGHT MUSCLES, WHICH WOULD BE THE PECS AS FAR AS ROUND SHOULDERS AND NEED TO STRENGTHEN THE UPPER BACK MUSCLES, UNLESS YOUR DOING AN EXERCISE WHICH UNWITTINGLY CHANGES YOUR POSTURE BECAUSE YOU DOING IT, IN SEATED ROW YOU ADJUST IN THE PELVIS, IF YOUR CRAP A HOLD OF THAT AND LET YOUR PELVIS COLLAPSE AND TRY TO PULL ON THAT YOU FEEL IT THROUGH THERE, SO YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN PULL YOUR PELVIS TO A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE, STRENGTHEN YOURSELF, AND YOU HAVE GREAT STRENGTH TO THE SHOULDER GIRDLE YOU WILL FIND, AND THAT IS A NATURAL INSTINCT, AND THAT UNWITTINGLY MAY HAVE SOME FEEDBACK FOR A PERSON TO CHANGE THROUGH HERE, BECAUSE THAT IS THE PROBLEM IN THE FIRST PLACE AND WHY THEY LIKE THAT, IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITHTHE WAY THIS MUSCLES HAVE BEEN EXERCISED IN LIFE, IT'S BEEN ON THE BASIS

-THIS LUDRICES IDEA TO HAVETO STRETCH CERTAIN MUSCLES AND WORK OTHERS TO COUNTERACT THAT OR PUT THEM IN SOME FUNNY . BRACE TO PULL THERE SHOULDERS BACK IS SO ACQUID, CAN'T BELIEVE IT, AND IT GOES ON TO A MASSIVE EXTEND IN THIS DAY OF AGE AND STILL THEY ARE STUPID AND PERSUID THIS AVENUE

-STATIC POSTURE IS CRAP BECAUSE REALLY THE POSTURAL CONCERNS ARE RELATED TO HOW WE FUNCTION WITH OUR THREE PLANES DYNAMIC POSTURE IS MORE IMPORTANT THEN A STATIC POSTURE, EVEN THO STATIC POSTURE CAN TAKE A TOLL ON YOUR SYSTEM DYNAMIC POSTURE IS MORE IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT'S MORE AGGRESIVE, LOADS YOU MORE, AS YOU LIFT,MOVE, DO THINGS IN LIFE WHATEVER IT MAY BE, IF YOU DO IT BADLY THEN IT TAKES A GREATER TOLL ON YOU THEN JUST STANDING STILL BADLY, OR SITTING STILL BADLY

-EVEN SMALL MOVEMENTS WITHOUT A GREAT DEAL OF LOAD, IF DONE REGULARY DYNAMICALLY, OVER AND OVER AGAIN WITH THAT BAD MECHANICAL BASIS TO OPERATE ON IT GONNA BE ARCHES FOR ME AND ALSO ENDURANCE, AND WILL TAKE IT'S TOLL

-IF YOU HAVE YOUR PELVIS POSITIONING WELL AND FUNCTIONING WELL THROUGH THE SAGITALL PLANE AS WELL AS THE OTHER TWO PLANES, THE MAJOR MUSCLES IN THE BODY GLUTES, HAMSTRINGS, QUADS WILL DRIVE YOU AND MAKE YOU FUNCTION, AND HAVE YOU SUCH A POSITION/FUNCTION THE MUSCLES WILL RESPOND TO LIFE, AND HENCE DEVELOP ACCORDINGLY TO WALK UPSTAIRS, RIDE A BIKE, TO RUN THE SAME APPLIES, GOOD PELVIC POSITION MAKES YOU CYCLE YOUR BIKE SO MUCH EASSIER, THE FORCE THROUGH THE PADDLE GOES SO MUCH EASSIER, TO DRIVE THE PADDLE DOWN IS DRIVEN FROM THE PELVIS

-THE SAGITAL PLANE ADJUSTMENT IS SUCH AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT TO OUR PERFORMANCE IN LIFE AND WHERE OUR STARVATION IS

-YOU DO NOT CIRCUMFERENCE YOUR POSTURAL POSITION TO ACHIEVE LIFTING A HEAVY WEIGHT, DRIVEN THROUGH THE GLUTES AND THE

HAMSTRINGS, AND OF COURSE THE BACK IS PULLING AT IT TOO, AND THE SHOULDERS JUST AT THE END

-THE CONCEPT THAT YOUR NOT ALLOWED YOUR KNEE HEIGHT PASS YOUR TOES, THAT IS DRIVEN FOR YOUR CAPACITY TO CHANGE SHAPE IN THE PELVIS, BECAUSE IF YOUR CAPACITY TO CHANGE SHAPE THROUGH HERE IS VERY BAD, A LOT OF PEOPLE CAN'T COLLAPSE THROUGH HERE AND HAVE THAT CURVE, THEY HAVE TO CHANGE THERE CURVE, OR THEY CAN NOT GO,THEY HAVE TO BEND THROUGH THERE HIP JOINT MORE TO BE ABLE TO MAINTAIN IT, THEY CAN NOT LOWER THERE BUD, SO THERE IS NOW A RESTRICTION AND THAT IS MOST LIKELY IN THE ACHILLES TENDON WHICH IS CAUSING THAT POSTERIOR MUSCLES, BECAUSE OF MOST LIKELY DYSFUNCTION AND TIGHTNING THROUGH HERE, BECAUSE OF MECHANICAL DYSFUNCTION OF THAT INDIVIDUAL

-THE OLYMPIC LIFTER ARE GOING ALL THE WAY DOWN, BUT THEY KEEP THERE LORDOTIC CURVE AS BEST AS IT CAN BE, AND THAT IS PARAMOUNT TO ACHIEVE THAT EXERCISE, YOU ARE NOT AN OLYMPIC LIFTER BUT USES THE SAME PRINCIPLES THROUGH LIFE WITH EVERYTHING YOU DO, EVERYTIME YOUR BEND THROUGH THAT HIP JOINT THAT SHOULD BE INVOLVED

-THE HIP FLEXORS ARE THE ONLY MUSCLES WHAT CAN SIT YOU UP, THE ABDOMINAL MUSCLES CAN'T SIT YOU UP BECAUSE THEY DON'T CROSS THE HIP JOINT

-THE LINK BETWEEN YOUR TOES AND YOUR HAND, ALL THE WAY UP AND THAT LINK MUST BE MAINTAINED, WHAT HAPPENS DOWN HERE TRANSFER UP HERE IN SO MANY SITUATIONS IN LIFE, IF YOU STUFF UP THE RELATIONSHIP ANYWHERE ALLONG THAT LINE YOU ARE GONNA TAKE A TOLL

-A PROPER LORDOTIC CURVE IS HAVING THE APEX IN THE RIGHT POSITION

-DON'T LOSE THE CONCEPT THAT WE ARE THREE DIMENSIONAL AND WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU CHANGE SHAPE, ESPECIALLY THROUGH THE SAGITAL PLANE, AND LOOK AT THE CHANGE OF MUSCLE FUNCTION VERSUS THE OTHER

-WITH A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE YOUR LIFTING THINGS BETTER, YOU HAVE YOUR BACK BETTER PROTECTED etc

-A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE OR ANTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS, WHERE IS THIS OPTIMAL POSITION ?

-A WIDE FOOT STANCE IS MORE RELATED TO A POSTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS VERSUS A MORE NATURAL STANCE WHERE THE FEET ARE IN CLOSER POSITION, A WIDE FOOT STANCE IS ANOTHER TELL TAIL SIGN THAT THIS PERSON HAS A POSTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS THAT IS NOT A THING YOU WOULD DO NATURALLY

-IF YOU STAND ON LESS SURFACE AREA THEN YOU NEED MORE MUSCLE CONTRACTION TO KEEP YOU BALANCED THE MORE SURFACE ARE YOU GIVE YOURSELF TO STAND ON THE MORE RELAXED YOU CAN BE WE HAVE MOVED OUT OF A STRUCTURAL CONCEPT TO SOMETHING WHICH IS FUNCTIONAL, BECAUSE AFTERALL WE WANT SOMETHING YOU CAN FUNCTION BETTER IN NOT JUST TO APPEAR IN SEEN STRUCTURAL NICE, THIS IS NOT A STATIC DRIVEN THING, EVEN YOU MIGHT FIND OR CONSIDER THAT BETTER STRUCTURAL POSITION OR MECHANICAL POSITION LOOKS NICER, RATHER THEN STATIC WE ARE MORE CONCERNED ABOUT DYNAMICS, TO CHANGE AND REDUCE THE STRESSES THROUGHOUT THE SYSTEM, SAGITAL SHIFT HAS ALL OF THIS TO OFFER

-WITH THE PELVIS IN POSTERIOR TILT WHEN LIFTING A LOAD YOU WILL BE LOADING MOST LIKELY YOUR LOWER BACK, THE MAJORITY THERE ABDOMINALS WILL NOT BE ABLE TO COME ON IN THAT POSITION, IN THAT POSITION YOUR ABDOMINALS WILL HAVE NO STRENGTH TO PROTECT YOUR BACK NOR LIFTING THAT BAR

-IF YOU CONTRACT YOUR ABS TIGHTEN YOUR GLUTES AND LIFT, IF YOU CONTRACT YOUR ABS BEFORE YOU START BENDING YOU WILL NOT CHANGE YOUR SHAPE, IT WILL STOP YOU FROM CHANGING YOUR SHAPE, WHY ? BECAUSE IT GOES FROM HERE TO THERE AND OBVIOUSLY STOP YOU FROM DOING THAT, IT'S THE WORST BIT ADVICE YOU CAN EVER BE GIVEN, AND WHILE YOUR ARE IN THIS POSTERIORLY TILTED POSITION YOUR GLUTES CAN'T WORK ANYHOW

THE MISCONCEPT OF MUSCLE IMBALANCE AND THERAPY

Posted by stephan van breenen on August 19, 2013 at 4:15 AM Comments comments (0)

-SO MANY THERAPIES ARE GEARED TO CORRECT THE MUSCLE IMBALANCE, IT DOESN'T MAKE ANY SENSE TO ME THE ROUND SHOULDERNESS THIS GOES THEREFORE TO SAY YOU NEED TO STRETCH THE TIGHT MUSCLES, WHICH WOULD BE THE PECS AS FAR AS ROUND SHOULDERS AND NEED TO STRENGTHEN THE UPPER BACK MUSCLES, UNLESS YOUR DOING AN EXERCISE WHICH UNWITTINGLY CHANGES YOUR POSTURE BECAUSE YOU DOING IT, IN SEATED ROW YOU ADJUST IN THE PELVIS, IF YOUR CRAP A HOLD OF THAT AND LET YOUR PELVIS COLLAPSE AND TRY TO PULL ON THAT YOU FEEL IT THROUGH THERE, SO YOU ALL OF A SUDDEN PULL YOUR PELVIS TO A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE, STRENGTHEN YOURSELF, AND YOU HAVE GREAT STRENGTH TO THE SHOULDER GIRDLE YOU WILL FIND, AND THAT IS A NATURAL INSTINCT, AND THAT UNWITTINGLY MAY HAVE SOME FEEDBACK FOR A PERSON TO CHANGE THROUGH HERE, BECAUSE THAT IS THE PROBLEM IN THE FIRST PLACE AND WHY THEY LIKE THAT, IT HAS NOTHING TO DO WITHTHE WAY THIS MUSCLES HAVE BEEN EXERCISED IN LIFE, IT'S BEEN ON THE BASIS

-THIS LUDRICES IDEA TO HAVETO STRETCH CERTAIN MUSCLES AND WORK OTHERS TO COUNTERACT THAT OR PUT THEM IN SOME FUNNY . BRACE TO PULL THERE SHOULDERS BACK IS SO ACQUID, CAN'T BELIEVE IT, AND IT GOES ON TO A MASSIVE EXTEND IN THIS DAY OF AGE AND STILL THEY ARE STUPID AND PERSUID THIS AVENUE

-STATIC POSTURE IS CRAP BECAUSE REALLY THE POSTURAL CONCERNS ARE RELATED TO HOW WE FUNCTION WITH OUR THREE PLANES DYNAMIC POSTURE IS MORE IMPORTANT THEN A STATIC POSTURE, EVEN THO STATIC POSTURE CAN TAKE A TOLL ON YOUR SYSTEM DYNAMIC POSTURE IS MORE IMPORTANT BECAUSE IT'S MORE AGGRESIVE, LOADS YOU MORE, AS YOU LIFT,MOVE, DO THINGS IN LIFE WHATEVER IT MAY BE, IF YOU DO IT BADLY THEN IT TAKES A GREATER TOLL ON YOU THEN JUST STANDING STILL BADLY, OR SITTING STILL BADLY

-EVEN SMALL MOVEMENTS WITHOUT A GREAT DEAL OF LOAD, IF DONE REGULARY DYNAMICALLY, OVER AND OVER AGAIN WITH THAT BAD MECHANICAL BASIS TO OPERATE ON IT GONNA BE ARCHES FOR ME AND ALSO ENDURANCE, AND WILL TAKE IT'S TOLL

-IF YOU HAVE YOUR PELVIS POSITIONING WELL AND FUNCTIONING WELL THROUGH THE SAGITALL PLANE AS WELL AS THE OTHER TWO PLANES, THE MAJOR MUSCLES IN THE BODY GLUTES, HAMSTRINGS, QUADS WILL DRIVE YOU AND MAKE YOU FUNCTION, AND HAVE YOU SUCH A POSITION/FUNCTION THE MUSCLES WILL RESPOND TO LIFE, AND HENCE DEVELOP ACCORDINGLY TO WALK UPSTAIRS, RIDE A BIKE, TO RUN THE SAME APPLIES, GOOD PELVIC POSITION MAKES YOU CYCLE YOUR BIKE SO MUCH EASSIER, THE FORCE THROUGH THE PADDLE GOES SO MUCH EASSIER, TO DRIVE THE PADDLE DOWN IS DRIVEN FROM THE PELVIS

-THE SAGITAL PLANE ADJUSTMENT IS SUCH AN IMPORTANT COMPONENT TO OUR PERFORMANCE IN LIFE AND WHERE OUR STARVATION IS

-YOU DO NOT CIRCUMFERENCE YOUR POSTURAL POSITION TO ACHIEVE LIFTING A HEAVY WEIGHT, DRIVEN THROUGH THE GLUTES AND THE

HAMSTRINGS, AND OF COURSE THE BACK IS PULLING AT IT TOO, AND THE SHOULDERS JUST AT THE END

-THE CONCEPT THAT YOUR NOT ALLOWED YOUR KNEE HEIGHT PASS YOUR TOES, THAT IS DRIVEN FOR YOUR CAPACITY TO CHANGE SHAPE IN THE PELVIS, BECAUSE IF YOUR CAPACITY TO CHANGE SHAPE THROUGH HERE IS VERY BAD, A LOT OF PEOPLE CAN'T COLLAPSE THROUGH HERE AND HAVE THAT CURVE, THEY HAVE TO CHANGE THERE CURVE, OR THEY CAN NOT GO,THEY HAVE TO BEND THROUGH THERE HIP JOINT MORE TO BE ABLE TO MAINTAIN IT, THEY CAN NOT LOWER THERE BUD, SO THERE IS NOW A RESTRICTION AND THAT IS MOST LIKELY IN THE ACHILLES TENDON WHICH IS CAUSING THAT POSTERIOR MUSCLES, BECAUSE OF MOST LIKELY DYSFUNCTION AND TIGHTNING THROUGH HERE, BECAUSE OF MECHANICAL DYSFUNCTION OF THAT INDIVIDUAL

-THE OLYMPIC LIFTER ARE GOING ALL THE WAY DOWN, BUT THEY KEEP THERE LORDOTIC CURVE AS BEST AS IT CAN BE, AND THAT IS PARAMOUNT TO ACHIEVE THAT EXERCISE, YOU ARE NOT AN OLYMPIC LIFTER BUT USES THE SAME PRINCIPLES THROUGH LIFE WITH EVERYTHING YOU DO, EVERYTIME YOUR BEND THROUGH THAT HIP JOINT THAT SHOULD BE INVOLVED

-THE HIP FLEXORS ARE THE ONLY MUSCLES WHAT CAN SIT YOU UP, THE ABDOMINAL MUSCLES CAN'T SIT YOU UP BECAUSE THEY DON'T CROSS THE HIP JOINT

-THE LINK BETWEEN YOUR TOES AND YOUR HAND, ALL THE WAY UP AND THAT LINK MUST BE MAINTAINED, WHAT HAPPENS DOWN HERE TRANSFER UP HERE IN SO MANY SITUATIONS IN LIFE, IF YOU STUFF UP THE RELATIONSHIP ANYWHERE ALLONG THAT LINE YOU ARE GONNA TAKE A TOLL

-A PROPER LORDOTIC CURVE IS HAVING THE APEX IN THE RIGHT POSITION

-DON'T LOSE THE CONCEPT THAT WE ARE THREE DIMENSIONAL AND WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU CHANGE SHAPE, ESPECIALLY THROUGH THE SAGITAL PLANE, AND LOOK AT THE CHANGE OF MUSCLE FUNCTION VERSUS THE OTHER

-WITH A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE YOUR LIFTING THINGS BETTER, YOU HAVE YOUR BACK BETTER PROTECTED etc

-A BETTER LORDOTIC CURVE OR ANTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS, WHERE IS THIS OPTIMAL POSITION ?

-A WIDE FOOT STANCE IS MORE RELATED TO A POSTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS VERSUS A MORE NATURAL STANCE WHERE THE FEET ARE IN CLOSER POSITION, A WIDE FOOT STANCE IS ANOTHER TELL TAIL SIGN THAT THIS PERSON HAS A POSTERIORLY TILTED PELVIS THAT IS NOT A THING YOU WOULD DO NATURALLY

-IF YOU STAND ON LESS SURFACE AREA THEN YOU NEED MORE MUSCLE CONTRACTION TO KEEP YOU BALANCED THE MORE SURFACE ARE YOU GIVE YOURSELF TO STAND ON THE MORE RELAXED YOU CAN BE WE HAVE MOVED OUT OF A STRUCTURAL CONCEPT TO SOMETHING WHICH IS FUNCTIONAL, BECAUSE AFTERALL WE WANT SOMETHING YOU CAN FUNCTION BETTER IN NOT JUST TO APPEAR IN SEEN STRUCTURAL NICE, THIS IS NOT A STATIC DRIVEN THING, EVEN YOU MIGHT FIND OR CONSIDER THAT BETTER STRUCTURAL POSITION OR MECHANICAL POSITION LOOKS NICER, RATHER THEN STATIC WE ARE MORE CONCERNED ABOUT DYNAMICS, TO CHANGE AND REDUCE THE STRESSES THROUGHOUT THE SYSTEM, SAGITAL SHIFT HAS ALL OF THIS TO OFFER

-WITH THE PELVIS IN POSTERIOR TILT WHEN LIFTING A LOAD YOU WILL BE LOADING MOST LIKELY YOUR LOWER BACK, THE MAJORITY THERE ABDOMINALS WILL NOT BE ABLE TO COME ON IN THAT POSITION, IN THAT POSITION YOUR ABDOMINALS WILL HAVE NO STRENGTH TO PROTECT YOUR BACK NOR LIFTING THAT BAR

-IF YOU CONTRACT YOUR ABS TIGHTEN YOUR GLUTES AND LIFT, IF YOU CONTRACT YOUR ABS BEFORE YOU START BENDING YOU WILL NOT CHANGE YOUR SHAPE, IT WILL STOP YOU FROM CHANGING YOUR SHAPE, WHY ? BECAUSE IT GOES FROM HERE TO THERE AND OBVIOUSLY STOP YOU FROM DOING THAT, IT'S THE WORST BIT ADVICE YOU CAN EVER BE GIVEN, AND WHILE YOUR ARE IN THIS POSTERIORLY TILTED POSITION YOUR GLUTES CAN'T WORK ANYHOW

THE DISADVANTAGE OF USING WEIGHT MACHINES IN THE GYM

Posted by stephan van breenen on May 4, 2013 at 8:20 AM Comments comments (0)

.CONSTANT RESISTANCE MACHINES IN THE GYM....

*CABLE/CHAIN ARRANGEMENT...WHERE YOU PULL A STACK OF WEIGHTS

WHAT TRAVELS THROUGH A PULLEY....WHEN YOU LOOK AT THE PULLEY

THE DISTANCE BETWEEN THE AXIS AND THE PULLEY...AND THE OUTER EDGE

OF THE PLANE(OR WHEEL OR PULLEY IT MOVES) OUTSIDE OF THE PULLEY

IS NOT AT THE SAME DISTANCE AS THE AXIS ALL THE WAY LINE OF THE PULLEY

HENCE THERE WILL BE A POSITION WHERE THE OUTSIDE EDGE OF THE PULLEY

IS AT A LESS DISTANCE...THEN ANOTHER PART OF IT....THAT IS CALLED A CANE

WHAT MEANS...BECAUSE THE FORCE ARM INCREASES...BECAUSE THE PULLEY

DISTANCE CHANGES...AS IF THAT FORCE ARM INCREASE...THE MECHANICS

OF THAT MACHINE...ALLOWS THE WEIGHT TO GET LIGHTER...EVEN THE WEIGHT

OF THE STACK IS STILL 10KG...

*IN FACT WHAT THOSE MACHINE ARE MADE TO DO.....IF YOU HAVE A 50KG STACK..

AT YOUR STICKING POINT....THE CANE GETS BIGGER....AND WHEN YOUR WEAKER

FROM A MECHANICAL POINT OF VIEUW..THE CANE MAKES UP FOR THAT

WEAKNESS....AND MAKES IT LIGHTER...HENCE IT'S CALLED A VARIABLE

RESISTANCE MACHINE....MECHANICS OF THE MACHINE CHANGING THE ACTUAL

LOAD...BECAUSE OF THE NATURE OF THE CANE....VARIABLE RESISTANCE

MACHINE...WHAT SHOULD MATCH OUR MECHANICAL DISADVANTAGE....WHEN

THE MACHINE HAS IT'S ADVANTAGE..HENCE...MAKES IT ALL EASSIER FOR YOU

TO TRAIN ON

*THE PROBLEM WITH THE MACHINE IS NOT REALLY LIFE LIKE.....LIFE IS NOT

VARIABLE RESISTANCE...LIFE IS CONSTANT RESISTANCE..BUT YOU HAVE TO

APPLY VARIABLE TENSION TO IT....TO OVERCOME IT

*LOAD IS CONSTANT...BUT THE TENSION DEVELOPED IS VARIABLE

*VARIABLE MACHINE TENDS TO MAKE.....IS THE TENSION CONSTANT....BUT THE

LOAD VARIABLE....IN LIFE THE LOAD IS NOT VARIABLE....IT IS CONSTANT ON US

*WE HAVE STICKING POINTS IN ALL OF OUR MECHANICAL ATTRIBUTES....AND WE

KNOW NATURALLY WHERE THEY ARE...INSTINCTIVLEY WE KNOW WHERE THEY ARE

WHEN WE ASK TO DO A TASK....WE PUTTING OURSELF IN THE STRONGEST

POSITION...WHAT IS RELATED TO OUR MECHANICAL ADVANTAGE....NOT TO OUR

MUSCLE OPTIMAL LENGTH.....BECAUSE MECHANICS RULES US...IT REALLY IS

THE PREDOMINATE THING WHAT DICTATES OUR PERFORMANCE

*A MUSCLE WILL UTILIZE LENGTH TENSION ..ONLY BECAUSE MECHANICS IS FAILING

AT THAT PARTICULAR POINT IN TIME....SO WE ARE BUILD THAT WAY

 

THE POSITION OF YOUR SHOULDER IS PERFECTLY RELATED TO THE POSITION OF YOUR PELVIS

Posted by stephan van breenen on May 4, 2013 at 8:15 AM Comments comments (0)

.THE POSITION OF YOUR SHOULDERS IS PERFECTLY RELATED TO THE POSITION

OF YOUR PELVIS

*CHANGE YOUR PELVIS AROUND...AND YOU RE-POSITION YOUR SHOULDERS

*THE CONCEPT OF WING SCAPULA...AND THAT THE SERRATUS ANTERIOR IS PLAYING

UP, THAT IS THE SAME STORY AS THE ROUNDED SHOULDERS

*YOUR WINGING YOUR SCAPULA....PURELY BECAUSE YOU HAVE ROUND SHOULDERS..

YOU HAVE A PLEVIS MISPOSITION, BUT YOU ALSO HAVE HEAVLY ROTATIONS THROUGH

YOUR AXIAL SKELETON, WHICH WILL POP THAT CLAVICLE, TURN IT, PULL THE

SHOULDER GIRDLE AROUND AND YOU HAVE A WINGING SCAPULA, SO IT'S A

MECHANICAL THING AND MUSCLES HAVE TO ADAPT TO THAT, SO DON'T BLAME THE

MUSCLES.

*ANOTHER CONCEPT OF CONSERVATIVE THERAPY...IS TRAINING THE BACK MUSCLES..

THERE IS AN EXERCISE CALLED THE SEATED ROW, TO BE ABLE TO DO THIS EXERCISE

WELL, PEOPLE ADJUST THE POSITION OF THE PELVIS, AND YOU MAY FIND THAT....

BECAUSE OF THE EXERCISE AND THE MECHANICAL CHANGE ASSOCIATED WITH THE

EXERCISE.....WHICH IMPROVE SHOULDER POSITION, NOT BECAUSE THEY HAVE DONE

ANYTHING TO THE MUSCLES, CAUSE AND EFFECT IS NOT REALLY ESTABLISHED HERE

IT'S NOT MUSCLE DEVELOPMENT WHAT CHANGE IT, UNWITTINGLY A CHANGE OF

MECHANICS.....UNWITTINGLY BECAUSE THAT'S NOT WHAT THEY AFTER, BECAUSE

THEY WHERE AFTER MUSCLE DEVELOPMENT

*ANOTHER STATEMENT OFTEN USED IN CONSERVATIVE THERAPY IS THE CONCEPT

THAT WITH SHORTENED MUSCLES YOU STRETCH THE HELL OUT OF IT....AND THE

LENGTHENED MUSCLES YOU GONNA EXERCISE AND BUILD UP

THAT IS A LUDRICRES TYPE OF THERAPY, IT DOESN'T HAVE ANY SOLID BASIS

WHAT DRIVES US TO BE DYSFUNCTIONAL DOWN THE SACROILIAC JOINT

Posted by stephan van breenen on May 4, 2013 at 8:05 AM Comments comments (0)

WHAT IS DRIVING US TO BE DYSFUNCTIONAL DOWN THE SACROILIAC JOINT

*IF YOU SCREW UP YOUR PROPER MECHANICS...THE WHEELS WILL COME OFF

*WHAT IS THE ROOT OF DYSFUNCTION.....THE SAME CAN BE ASK...WHAT MAKES

A TOPLINE ATHLETE.....IT DOESN'T COME FROM THE PHYSIOLOGY....IT'S THE

UNDERLYING MECHANICS WHAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE.....OTHERWISE A TOP

LINE ATHLETE WOULDN'T BEABLE TO RUN A MARATHON AT THE SPEED IT DOES..

IF HIS MECHANICS WHERE NOT IN CHECK

*IF YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT MAKES YOU GIFTED....HOW WILL YOU KNOW HOW

TO MAINTAIN IT

*PEOPLE DON'T NORMALLY COME TO YOU IF THEY DON'T HAVE PAIN OR A

PROBLEM

*WHEN THEY COME TO YOU.....YOU WANT TO STOP IT IN IT'S TRACKS.....

SLOW IT DOWN.....REDUCE LOAD SOMEWHERE......REVERSE IT

*HOW DID YOU CHANGE IT.....WHAT DID YOU CHANGE.....KNOW HOW TO USE IT.....

KNOW HOW TO MAINTAIN IT.....TEACH THEM HOW TO USE IT AND MAINTAIN IT

*LIFE IS A MANAGEMENT PROGRAM.....TO MAINTAIN FUNCTIONALITY

Healthy Ligaments to avoid risk of Injuries

Posted by stephan van breenen on March 6, 2011 at 10:30 PM Comments comments (1)

Ligaments should be tight

Bones and their joint capsules supply the primary structure of our bodies. Muscle-tendon units enable our bodies to move these bones at the joints. Ligaments supply the stability we need at the joints in order for our movements to be controlled and safe. All these parts of thebody must do their individual jobs interdependently to allow uspain-free movement. For ligaments, this means that their fibers must be flexible enough to allow normal movement and yet tight enough to protect the joints and the bones they connect. Ligaments limit movement and provide stability so that we do not fall over when we walk, run or suddenly move to the side.


While it is healthy for us to have muscles that are loose and relaxed, it is not healthy for us to have ligaments that are loose. To appreciate the necessity for tight ligaments, imagine a door where the hinges are loose because the screws are not screwed in tightly. The loose hinges will allow the door to rock around until, eventually, the door or the frame, or both, become damaged or broken. In contrast, hinges that are securely attached to both door and frame allow the door to open and close smoothly, with no undue pressure on any part of the door’s structure.

Ligaments function in a similar way. When loose, ligaments allow too much movement at a joint and can lead to injury not only in the ligaments themselves, but also in the relevant joint capsule, tendons and muscles. Appropriately tight ligaments hold the joint stable during movement, thereby limiting the possibility of injury.

Ligaments can become loose in three ways: Through genetics, trauma or by the development of distended scar tissue.


• Genetically,an individual may be born with ligaments that are too long for hisbody’s structure. We all remember kids we would call“double-jointed” because they could get into all sorts of positions that were unimaginable for the rest of us. These individuals did not actually have two joints instead of one; they simply had ligaments that were longer than their joints needed,allowing them to be much more flexible than the norm. Unfortunately,these very flexible individuals are also very vulnerable to injury because they lack joint stability.


• Secondly,trauma from a sudden blow or a severe accident can, in a moment,stretch a ligament permanently.


• Thethird and very common method that leads to loose ligaments is thedevelopment of adhesive scar tissue. Whether the ligamentous scar tissue results from repeated injury or from surgery, it can stretchand distend over time. When it does, this distended scar tissue leaves the person vulnerable to further injury, often of a more serious nature.

 

 

 

Weight Training and Knee Injuries

Posted by stephan van breenen on February 26, 2011 at 11:14 PM Comments comments (0)

KNEE INJURIES

Knee pain secondary to weight lifting is often caused by an overuse injury involving the patello femoral joint, or the quadriceps or patellar tendons. However,tears to the menisci may also occur. Patello femoral pain syndrome may or may not include chondromalacia. Ligamentous problems are rare except when caused by trauma during Olympic weight lifting.

 

One study  found that former elite weight lifters had a 31% incidence of osteoarthritis of the knee as compared with former runners who had only a 14% increased incidence of osteoarthritis of the knee. The patello femoral joint was the most common location. One should keep in mind that Olympic lifts require ballistically dropping into a very deep squat, to the point where the hamstrings rest against the calves. Such extreme squatting positions result in very high meniscal compressive forces and patello femoral contact forces. Also,competitive lifters often lift maximal weights. Elastic knee wraps are frequently worn while performing squats and other heavy leg exercises with the intention of protecting the knee joint. Such wraps may increase the friction between the patella and the underlying cartilage, thus increasing the risk of knee injury.

 

Some general rules of thumb for athletes with patellofemoral pain are:


Do not perform squats through a painful range of motion(often in the midrange).

Do not perform lunges or squats with the knees caving inward (keep the knees over the toes).

Focus on the last 10' to 15' of knee extension when performing knee extension exercises.

Take care not to press the kneecaps into the bench when performing leg curls (or any prone position of exercise). In other words, move toward the foot of the bench so that the patellae are not compressed while the knees are extended.

 

If the weightlifter has had damage to the anterior cruciate ligament it isimportant to:

Avoid knee extension exercises (especially from 70' of flexion to full extension).

Substitute seated knee extensions with closed chain exercises such as partial squats and leg presses.

Focus on hamstring development (adds some dynamic support).

 

The greatest number of knee injuries occur as the result of hacksquats. However, regular squats, leg presses, knee extensions,lunges, step-ups, and leg curls may all play a role in overuse injuries. In particular, bouncing at the bottom of a squat has been implicated as a cause of patellar tendon strain due to the high eccentric forces generated during this technique. One case report even documents a bilateral quadriceps tendon rupture that occurredwhile squatting.

 

 

Common Shoulder Injuries in Weight Lifting

Posted by stephan van breenen on February 25, 2011 at 7:24 PM Comments comments (1)

SHOULDER INJURIES

As a trade-off for mobility, the shoulder lacks some of the stability found in otherjoints. The shoulder is under considerable stress during many commonly performed weight training exercises and, as a result, is frequently injured. Shoulder pain is often taken for granted or ignored by many bodybuilders. For example, anteriorshoulder pain felt secondary to performing bench presses (ie,achieving a "burn") is frequently assumed to be a sore anterior deltoid muscle from a hard workout. It may, in fact,represent a sign of rotator cuff strain or impingement.


Impingement syndrome and anterior instability are the most common types of shoulder conditions associated with weight training. It is important to recognize that these conditions often coexist. Rotator cuff strain/tendinitis/tear, proximal biceps tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis frequently result from subacromial impingement. However,primary tendinitis resulting from overload may also occur. Less common types of shoulder injuries include brachial plexus neuropathy,suprascapular nerve impingement, posterior glenohumeral instability(due to heavy bench presses), acromio-clavicular joint sprains (AC),proximal biceps tendon tears, pectoralis major strains or tears, andosteolysis of the distal clavicle.



Impingementsyndrome

Impingementsyndrome refers to impingement of the rotator cuff tendons,especially the supraspinatus tendon, under the subacromial arch. The biceps tendon or the subacromial bursa may also be impinged under the subacromial arch. The position that appears to be most damaging is abduction with internal rotation. It is not clear whether rotatorcuff muscle/ tendon overload precedes impingement or is caused by it.


A major factor in shoulder impingement injuries in weight lifters is the muscle imbalance syndrome , highlighted by overly tightshoulder internal rotators and weak shoulder external rotators. A substantial portion of the typical trainingprogram is dedicated to training the pectorals and the lats. Both tend to produce internal rotation of the shoulders. The external shoulder rotators (the infraspinatus and the teres minor) are often neglected.


There is considerable stress imposed on the rotator cuff muscles during the performance of many exercises, such as the bench press. Too many sets of exercises for the same body part with excessive weight can result in fatigue and overload injury to the rotator cuff. Therefore, weightlifters should be encouraged to perform fewer sets and no more than12 sets per body part, including warm-ups.


A common exercise is the lateral raise with the shoulder in internal rotation.The lifter is often instructed to point the thumb down as though pouring water from a pitcher in an effort to better isolate the side deltoid. It may be true, but there is a risk of accelerating or aggravating an impingement syndrome. Lateral raises should be performed face down on an incline benchpositioned at about 75 degrees up from the ground. This position will isolate the side delts without creating impingement.


Another common mistake is raising the arms above 90 degrees while performing sideraises. Unless the thumb is pointing up, this position may increase the risk of impinging the rotator cuff tendons under the subacromial arch. Shoulder protraction is associated with narrowing of thesubacromial space. Allowing the shoulders to become protracted forward beyond the neutral position during the performance of exercises such as bench presses may increase the strain to this area.


Anterior instability of the glenohumeral joint

Instability may be due to a single-event trauma where the capsule and glenoid labrum are torn or may be a traumatic representing a tendency toward a loosejoint capsule. When either inherently loose or torn loose, the capsule may be unable to support the shoulder in the extremes of abduction and external rotation. Therefore, exercises that place the shoulder in this position should be modified or avoided such as the behind-the-neck press, the behind-the-neck pulldown, and the pecdeck .


It may also occur from repeatedly hyperextending the shoulder during the performance of bench presses,flyes, and the pec deck by lowering the bar or dumbbells to the point where the elbows are behind the back. Weight lifters not only place their shoulders in an abducted/externally rotated or hyperextended position, but also do it with considerable weight held in their hands. The general principle to use is to avoid positions in which the elbows extend behind the coronal plane of the body. It is important to remind that overhead positions are less stable and therefore more risky. While instability is often caused by gradual repetitive capsular stretching injury, Olympiclifters tend to suffer instability resulting from a single-eventtraumatic injury. They often lose control of a weight while holdingthe weight in an overhead position.


It should be noted that the diagnosis of anterior instability may be overlooked due to a misleading response to testing.pain is often experienced in the posterior shoulder when the arm is placed in an abducted/externally rotated position. It is thought that this posterior pain arises from traction or compression of the posterior structures as the shoulder subluxates forward. Also, anterior instability may be misdiagnosed as a rotator cuff strain.


The load and shift test is a form of instability testing that involves passively translating the humeral head while stabilizing the glenoid. This test may be performed  in various positions, including seated with arm by the side, seated with the arm in the abducted andexternally rotated position, and supine with the arm abducted and externally rotated. Excessive forward excursion of the humerus associated with either pain, apprehension, or clicking may all beconsidered positive signs.


The relocation test should reduce the positive findings. This test involves restabilizing the humerus by pushing the head of the humerus from anterior to posterior whileplacing the arm in the "apprehension" position of abduction/external rotation. The relocation test is performed  supine. Care should be taken to support the arm to avoid protective muscle spasm.

Impingement may occur secondary to shoulder instability. The response to testing includes pain felt with the apprehension test that is relieved by the relocation test. Apprehension is usually not the primary response to testing. In such cases, the underlying instability and the subsequentimpingement



Less commonshoulder injuries related to weight training

There have been a number of reports in the literature of suprascapular nerve injury either via stretch or compression. Abduction of the arm against resistance has been implicated as the mechanism of injury. The lateral raise and the shoulder press are two exercises that involve abduction against resistance.

 

A number of reports document the occurrence of tears of the pectoralismajor muscle or tendon, usually from bench pressing. The tendon may either avulse from the bone, tear at the musculotendinous junction,or tear in the muscle itself, usually near the musculo tendinous junction. Most of these injuries occur while the arms are extended behind the chest. To prevent such injuries the lifter should avoid lowering the bar to the point at which the shoulder is hyperextended.Regular stretching may be helpful.

 

An entity known as atraumatico-steolysis of the distal clavicle has been reported in a number of studies as being related to weighttraining. This condition, referred to as weight lifter's shoulder, is marked by pain at the acromioclavicular joint while performing the dip, bench press, clean-and-jerk, and overhead presses. Radiographsshow osteoporosis and loss of subchondral bony detail at the dista lclavicle. In addition, cystic changes may also be present.


Atraumatic osteolysis is believed to result from repetitive loading of the acromioclavicular joint resulting in neurovascular compromise to the distal clavicle. Management is difficult given that most patients are serious lifters. Either a dramatic reduction in weight,elimination of the offending maneuver, or substitution of exercises may be suggested. Alternatives to the bench press include a narrowgrip bench, cable crossovers, and the incline or decline press. Ifunsuccessful, elimination of heavy lifting for 6 months isrecommended. There is some evidence that those treated surgically with amputation of the distal I to 2 cm of the clavicle are able to return to some lifting. However, many athletes are not able to returnto a pre-injury level of lifting.

 


 


 


 


 


 

 

Weight Training and Cervical Spine Injuries

Posted by stephan van breenen on February 25, 2011 at 6:49 PM Comments comments (0)

CERVICAL SPINE INJURIES

While not as common as back injuries, neck injuries occur fairly frequently in weightlifters. Cervical spine problems include mechanical sprains and strains, disc injuries, and brachial plexus injuries. Soft tissue injuries may result from protruding the head forward or from unnecessarily tensing the neck while weight training. Some problems result from a muscle imbalance syndrome similar to the "uppercrossed syndrome" .



This problem occurs because of imbalance in training programs that involve an in ordinate amount of exercise for the pectorals, the front delts, the lats, and the biceps and very little training of antagonist muscle groups.The result can be overly developed and tight pectoralis major and minor,latissimus dorsi, front deltoids, trapezium, biceps, and stemocleidomastoid muscles, especially if proper attention has not been given to maintaining flexibility in these muscle groups. It is often accompanied by relative weakness of the middle and lower trapezium, rhomboids, the upper thoracic extensors, the deep neckflexors, the rear delts, and the external shoulder rotators (the infraspinatus and the teres minor) It results in the rounded shoulder, forward head posture frequently seen in bodybuilders.


Exercises in which the head is allowed to nod or protrude forward may contribute to cervical spine injury by either promoting the postural defect noted previously, or by predisposing the athlete to cervical disc problems.The tendency to jut the head forward in exercises such as shrugs, behind the neck presses, behind the neckpulldowns, lateral shoulder raises , triceps extensions,curls, incline leg presses, and abdominal crunches promotes the development of the rounded shoulder, forward head posture. This posture is associated with abnormal mechanical function of thecervical spine. It is characterized by adaptive shortening of the suboccipital muscles, the stemocleidomastoid and the anterior scalenemuscles, and excessive tension and weakening of the long cervicalextensor muscles, the levator scapulae and the scapular retractor muscles.


Trigger points and/or muscle strain may result in any of these muscles. Either upper cervical or cervico-thoracic joint dysfunction may result. Not only do cervical pain syndromes occur,but also temporomandibular joint dysfunction and headache.


Protraction(protrusion) of the head during exercises in which the neck musclesare under load has also been linked with an increased risk of cervical disc derangement (herniation). The forward head posture results in anterior shearing and increased compression of the lower cervical discs as the head slides forward and the upper cervical spine becomes hyperextended. Forceful contraction of the trapezium,the sternocleidomastoid, and the other cervical muscles will increase the load on the cervical discs and the facets. This finding correlates with an epidemiologic study that found that weighttraining, particularly with free weights, was associated with an increased risk of cervical disc herniation. Cailliet claims that this forward head posture also leads to accelerated degenerative changes in the cervical spine. He notes that each inch the head protrudes forward of the trunk results in the equivalent load of an extra head that the neck must support.


It should be noted that during the performance of some exercises, untrained lifters commonly not only protract the head but also tense and flex the neckforward during the performance of exercises. This action occurs most frequently with curls, lateral raises, and leg presses. This habit may be even more damaging than simply protruding the head. Beginning with the novice athlete, bench presses-both flat and incline-arecommonly incorporated into weight training and may be involved in the cause of cervical spine injury. It is not clear whether the injury occurs from protrusion of the head as the bar is lowered or from forcibly hyperextending the neck (ie, driving the head backward intothe bench) as the weight is pushed up.


Neck strengthening is a controversial topic. Little research has investigated the role of neck strengthening in injury prevention. Mobility of the cervical spine is important and may be emphasized to the exclusion of strengthening. Some experts recommend that rehabilitative exercises be directed toward strengthening the scapular muscles with the cervical spine held in the neutral position. However,others have achieved good results with direct neck strengthening exercises, especially those directed at the cervical extensors.

 


 


 


 


 


Weight Training and Lumbar Spine Injuries

Posted by stephan van breenen on February 24, 2011 at 11:01 PM Comments comments (0)

LUMBAR SPINE INJURIES

In both youths and adults the most common weight training injuries involve the lowerback. The mechanisms of injury include hyper flexion, hyper extension,torsion, and overdevelopment and excessive tightening of the iliopsoas muscles.

The most common back problems are mechanical sprains and strains; however, disc injury or spondylolisthesis may also occur. Spondylolisthesis may be due to the stress imposed at the neural arch while performing exercises that involve repetitive lumbarspine flexion and extension under load. It is particularly true of dead-lifts.


The greatest number of weight training-related back injuries result from exercises in which the trainee is in the flexed posture, such as rows and dead-lifts. A bent barbell row is often performed standing with heavyweight held at arm's length while bent at the waist and the legs held straight. This position creates perhaps the greatest amount of contractile tension on the lumbar spine musculature and the greatest lumbar disc pressure.


A frequent error is to allow the back to round and then to jerk the weight up using the hip muscles to generate power. Lumbar flexion while lifting results in the load being shifted from the back muscles to the posterior ligaments, the thoracolumbar fascia, and the lumbar discs.

The lower back muscle stop contracting when the spine is sufficiently flexed, a phenomen onknown as the flexion relaxation response of the erector spinae.It may result in injury to ligaments or discs.


The seated cable row exercise may also result in a hyperflexion injury to the lumbarspine, a problem often encountered in this author's practice. The injury usually results from leaning forward at the starting point of each rep, allowing the spine to flex, in an effort to get a goodstretch.

Extremely heavyweights are sometimes used in weightlifting exercises. As much as 1,000 lb can be used in the squat and dead-lift. While steadily applied compressive forces alone rarely injure the disc, rupture ofthe vertebral end plate or fatigue microfractures of the trabeculaeof the vertebral bodies may result.


Research reveals that retired heavyweight lifters exhibit significantly greater reduction of discheight on X-ray compared with controls.


Hyperextension injury to the spine may result from arching backward while performing unsupported overhead presses, moving into a hyperextended position while performing the back extension exercise ballistically,or while performing prone leg curls. During the leg curl, there is a strong tendency for the spine to be pulled into hyperextension as the psoas comes into play to assist the hamstrings.


Hyperextension can cause abnormal loading of the facet joints and the capsules,resulting in an inflammatory response. It can also increase the load on a pre existing spondylolisthesis, resulting in greater strain to the supporting tissues. The solution is to contract the abdominals while pulling the hips against the bench in order to maintain a neutral lumbar positive. In addition, patients should be advised to avoid using too heavy a weight or overstraining at the end of a set.


Injury to either the facets or the discs may occur from rotational exercises such as twists or from the rotary torso machine. The lumbar spine is particularly vulnerable to torsional forces. Due to the sagittal orientation of the facets, only a limited amount of rotation canoccur in the lumbar spine. Additional rotation may result in injuryto the facets or shearing of the discs. Research  suggests a link between twisting while lifting and an increased risk of disc herniation.


Twisting exercises are often performed in an attempt to isolate the transverse abdominus muscle and create a thinner waistline. However, the transverse abdominus does not contract while rotating the torso, and twisting exercises will not trim the waist. Despite its horizontal fiber orientation, the transverse abdominus functions mainly to compress the abdomen during functions such as forced expiration and defecation.


Many commonly performed abdominal exercises may contribute to lower back injury through overdevelopment and tightening of the hip flexor, iliopsoas muscles. When the iliopsoas Muscle contracts, it exerts both increased compressive and shear forces on the lumbar spine.


Many abdominal exercises are actually exercises in which the hip flexor muscles rather than the abdominals perform much or all of the work. These exercises include full sit-ups, straight leg raises, high chairand hanging leg raises, crunches with the feet hooked under a sofa oran apparatus in the gym, V-ups, Roman Chair rocking crunches, and most abdominal machines. Hooking the feet under a stationary objectfor support increases the tendency for the hip flexors to be recruited during sit-ups.

 

 


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